Subscribe to our newsletter
Search
Close this search box.

Unforgettable Orioles Moments: Reliving the Team’s Greatest Triumphs

man holding two white baseballs
Share
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Reading Time: 4 minutes

image link

The Baltimore Orioles are one of the proudest franchises in all of baseball. Unfortunately for their fan base, they haven’t had a lot to be excited about recently. The team did return to the playoffs in 2023 after a long drought so maybe some more unforgettable moments are on the horizon still.

To find the most unforgettable Orioles moments, fans have to dive pretty deep into the history books. The franchise was able to win World Series titles in the ‘60s, ’70s, and ’80s but has failed to do so since 1983. Anyone who likes bets with bet999.io would be taking a big risk if they wager that the team is going to make it back to fight for the Commissioner’s Trophy in 2024.

Any young supporters of the team would do well to learn some history about their beloved Orioles. These are some of the most memorable moments in the history of the franchise. Keeping track on the progress of your favorite team is as easy as buying stocks now.

Frank Robinson’s Home Run to Win the Franchise’s First World Series

It was 1966 when the Orioles won the World Series for the first time. They did so by sweeping the Dodgers four games to nothing. The Orioles were able to clinch the series in a tight game at home at the old Memorial Stadium.

Frank Robinson hit a solo home run in the 4th inning to give the team a 1-0 lead to that point. It was pitching and defense the rest of the way to be able to clinch the title. The team’s impressive defense actually shut out the Dodgers in the last 2 games of the series en route to winning the championship.

Robinson ended up being named the World Series MVP in that 1966 Championship. The designation did come with its fair share of controversy since it was clearly the pitching that carried the team to victory. However, Robinson did hit two home runs throughout the series, and of course, it was his run that made all of the difference in that final game.

Brooks Robinson’s Dominant Performance in the 1970 World Series

Many of the players from the 1966 Championship team remained with the Orioles and were the cornerstone of a squad that reached the World Series three consecutive years. In 1969 and 1971 the team would unfortunately fall short of winning it all. The 1970 season, however, would see the Orioles crowned once again, and this time around, they were boosted by the amazing play of Brooks Robinson.

Robinson was also part of the 1966 team that won it all but lost out in the MVP voting to Frank Robinson. In 1970, there was no doubt, though, that Brooks was the true leader of the Orioles in spite of the fact that Frank Robinson continued hitting home runs that greatly contributed to the team’s win over the Cincinnati Reds. This time, it took the team five games to close out the series.

Brooks Robinson’s defensive play throughout his entire career was so impressive that he still holds the MLB record for career putouts. In the 1970 World Series, though, it was his bat that was on fire as well. He batted .491, and he set the record for most bases in a five-game series with 17.

The man also tied the record at the time of most hits in a World Series game with four. It wasn’t just one moment, but there’s no doubt that the brilliance of “Mr. Oriole” took the team to the top in 1970.

Rick Dempsey and Eddie Murray Go Off in Game 5 in 1983

After the team’s great run in the late ‘60s and early ’70s, there was no more World Series success until 1983. The team looked quite different by the time 1983 rolled around; however, fans may be surprised to know that some players who played in the ’60s were still playing into the ’90s.

That was the case with catcher Rick Dempsey, who was named the World Series MVP in ’83. He started his playing career in 1969 and retired in 1992. His greatest moment as an Oriole was, without a doubt, game five against the Phillies in Veterans Stadium.

Dempsey would go on to hit a home run in that game and a double while scoring two of the five runs that won the Orioles the game. Eddie Murray, who was one of the team’s best hitters during that season, also went off in game five. He had been really quiet throughout the series but managed to find his best form at just the right time.

Murray would go on to homer twice in that game, which ended in a 5-0 score in favor of the Orioles. These two men will forever be linked to the last Orioles World Series victory. There is one final moment, though, that is worth noting. Although it’s certainly a glorious moment for one of the game’s greats, it also represents what the Baltimore franchise has mostly become since the ‘80s.

Cal Ripken’s Final Out in the World Series

That 1983 team that won the World Series at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia featured one of the most iconic players in the history of the sport. As fate would have it, Cal Ripken Jr. would make the final out that gave the Orioles their last World Series.

In 1983, Ripken was still a rising star, but not many people would’ve ventured to predict what he would become. Ripken would go on to play his entire career with the Orioles, which lasted until 2001. In the process, he would break Lou Gehrig’s consecutive games streak.

Ripken’s consecutive game streak hit the current record of 2,632. He was even named to the All-Century team as a shortstop, but he never made it back to the World Series after 1983. That’s why his iconic final out against the Phillies is so unforgettable for Orioles fans.

The future is looking bright for Baltimore, finally winning the division after almost 10 years in 2023. Unfortunately, many of the memorable moments that fans have had since 1983 can’t make the cut as “unforgettable” since they didn’t happen in the biggest of games.

One Response

  1. The last 3 games (not 2) of the 1966 World Series were complete game shutouts, 6 – 0 by Jim Palmer, 1 – 0 by Wally Bunker, and then 1 – 0 by Dave McNally. So no bullpen involved in those last 3 games.
    The only bullpen pitcher who actually pitched was Moe Drabowski, who relieved McNally in game 1. Drabowski struck out World Series record 11 hitters in 6 2/3 innings.
    So the assertion that “clearly the bullpen that carried the team to victory” isn’t an accurate assessment.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

One Response

  1. The last 3 games (not 2) of the 1966 World Series were complete game shutouts, 6 – 0 by Jim Palmer, 1 – 0 by Wally Bunker, and then 1 – 0 by Dave McNally. So no bullpen involved in those last 3 games.
    The only bullpen pitcher who actually pitched was Moe Drabowski, who relieved McNally in game 1. Drabowski struck out World Series record 11 hitters in 6 2/3 innings.
    So the assertion that “clearly the bullpen that carried the team to victory” isn’t an accurate assessment.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get notified of the Latest Sport News Update from Our Blog
Join our newsletter and get 20% discount
Promotion nulla vitae elit libero a pharetra augue